Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Waiting on Wednesday (#43) - Half in Love with Death by Emily Ross (December 16th 2015 by Merit Press)


Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Jill over at Breaking the Spine that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating. 
For more information click here


Half in Love with Death by Emily Ross


It's the era of peace and love in the 1960s, but nothing is peaceful in Caroline's life. Since her beautiful older sister disappeared, fifteen-year-old Caroline might as well have disappeared too. She's invisible to her parents, who can't stop blaming each other. The police keep following up on leads even Caroline knows are foolish. The only one who seems to care about her is Tony, her sister's older boyfriend, who soothes Caroline's desperate heart every time he turns his magical blue eyes on her. 

Tony is convinced that the answer to Jess's disappearance is in California, the land of endless summer, among the runaways and flower children. Come with me, Tony says to Caroline, and we'll find her together. Tony is so loving, and all he cares about is bringing Jess home. And so Caroline follows, and closes a door behind her that may never open again.

Inspired by the disturbing case of Charles Schmid, ‘the Pied Piper of Tucson’, Half in Love with Death is a heartfelt thriller that never lets up

"Since her beautiful older sister disappeared, fifteen-year-old Caroline might as well have disappeared too."


"The only one who seems to care about her is Tony, her sister's older boyfriend, who soother Caroline's desperate heart every time he turns his magical blue eyes on her."


"California, the land of endless summer, among the runaways and flower children"


"And so Caroline follows, and closes a door behind her that may never open again."


"Inspired by the disturbing case of Charles Schmid, 'the Pied Piper of Tuscon'"




What are you waiting for this week?

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Top Ten Tuesday (#46) - 10 Books To Read If You Like Sarah Dessen's Novels

For more information on Top Ten Tuesday, click here


For me, Sarah Dessen is one of the queens of contemporary YA literature and honestly, YA literature in general. I read my first Sarah Dessen novel back in 2007 and she introduced me to this whole new genre of books that I had never really thought of become. Yes, I had read books targeted for young adults, but mostly by Finnish authors. Sarah Dessen's The Truth About Forever introduced me to a whole new world of books. As a result of it I found the YA section from Books-a-Million during my exchange year in United States and honestly, I can say that it has had a life changing effect on me. YA literature has become such a huge part of my life (as this blog proves), and I am forever grateful for that. 

This week, I will share with you ten titles that I think you might like if you have enjoyed the novels of Sarah Dessen. Some of these are well-known, some not, but what they all share is awesomeness!


The Anatomical Shape of a Heart by Jenn Bennett - like many of Sarah Dessen's books, The Anatomical Shape of a Heart is a perfect blend of a love story and a family story. The romance is realistic and heartwarming, the character chemistry is tangible and the writing is amazing! I had a very hard time putting this book down. 

Between Us and the Moon by Rebecca Maizel - The one thing I love the most about Sarah Dessen's novels are the way she writes family dynamics. Thought the romance found from Between Us and the Moon is interesting, I found the family dynamics, especially the relationships between the two sisters, Bean and Scarlett, extremely interesting to read about. Between Us and the Moon is quite a slow-burning read, but it impressed me with its character development, especially in relation to the main character Bean. To make one more Dessen connection, this is also set on a beach, like many of Dessen's novels are.

First & Then by Emma Mills - This wonderful contemporary read described as a mix of Friday Night Lights and Pride and Prejudice also includes a wonderful romance, incredible character development and self-discovery and interesting supporting characters like Foster, the main character's young cousin who suddenly moves in to live with her family and changes her perceptions about her life and her family.

How to Say I Love You Out Loud by K.A. Cozzo - I loved the complicated main character of this novel, Jordyn and the way some of the things she does made me question her actions and her motivations. I loved to read about the things Jordyn goes through and how she learns about her brother and his illness and the ways she can possibly help. There's also romance in here, and the chemistry between Jordyn and her love interest is palpable, but at the end of the day, this one is a story about a girl and her love for her brother.

Kissing in America by Margo Rabb - Like several of the books on the this list, this one also includes a great family component, this time a relationship between a daughter and a mother. I love my mother SO MUCH and I always loved to read about a mother-daughter relationships and how mothers and daughters can love each other despite differences in opinions. There's also an awesome friendship in this novel, another aspect I love about YA contemporary and Sarah Dessen's novels. 

The Wrong Side of Right by Jenn Marie Thorne - My excitement towards this book, which in its synopsis mentions both Sarah Dessen and Aaron Sorkin (the creator of my favorite drama ever, The West Wing) was insane! It definitely was one of my most expected novels of the year, and though it did not blow me away quite as much as I expected, I did love it! This one has a great main character, problematic family relations, a romance, friendships... It is also extremely well written, and the characterization and character development really took me by surprise. I also LOVE LOVE LOVE the political setting and definitely wish that it comes more used in YA (IF THERE ARE ANY YA CONTEMPORARIES WITH POLITICAL SETTING THAT YOU KNOW OF, PLEASE LET ME KNOW!)

Magnolia by Kristi Cook - I am obsessed with the American South and this one was one of those books that fed my obsession. It is also one of those books that I happened to find just at the right time and once I started it, I could not put it down (I almost missed on Christmas dinner because of this book!). There's romance, family drama, witty dialogue and scenes that will definitely make you swoon! It is fast paced, entertaining and just a lot of fun to read. 

Saving June by Hannah Harrington - This tear-jerker of a book shares brilliant characterization and character journeys and relationships as well as well-established family drama/family dynamics with the works of Sarah Dessen. For me personally this book was kind of a meditative experience in the sense that though it brought up memories of my father's suicide, it helped me to understand by feelings a little better through being able to relate with someone, even if that someone was fictional. Saving June is a beautiful, well-written, extremely touching book that I wish more people would be aware of.

The Next Door Boys by Jolene Betty Perry - First of all, I want to mention that unlike Dessen's novels, this one has a religious aspect. But I also do want to mention that I did not know of it when I started reading this one. Those who know me, know that I am not religious AT ALL, and usually because of that I am turned off by books with a religious elements, but this one did not do it! I actually gave this 5 stars back in the day because I for me it was a great reading experience with realistic, fragile characters that have to cope with their problems and their pasts in order to go on. 

Echoes of Love by Rosie Rushton - It has been AGES since I read this one, but while browsing my bookshelf for titles to be included on this list, I thought I should mention it here. Echoes of Love is a YA contemporary retelling of Jane Austen's Persuasion set in the British seaside. In it Anna Eliot is a daughter of a famous TV show host and Felix Wentworth is a young soldier who comes back from Afghanistan as a war hero. Drama, misunderstandings and romance follows as Felix comes back to his hometown after deployment and comes in contact with Anna after she once broke his heart. 


What other titles would you recommend for the fans of Sarah Dessen?
Did any of these catch your interest (I really hope so)?

Monday, September 28, 2015

Book Review: Why Not Me? by Mindy Kaling

Release date: September 15, 2015
Author links: Goodreads - Twitter
Publisher: Crown Archetype
Age group: Adult
Pages: 240
Purchase links: Amazon - Book Depository

Description (from Goodreads):

From the author of the beloved New York Times bestselling book Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? and the creator and star of The Mindy Project comes a collection of essays that are as hilarious and insightful as they are deeply personal.

In Why Not Me?, Kaling shares her ongoing journey to find contentment and excitement in her adult life, whether it’s falling in love at work, seeking new friendships in lonely places, attempting to be the first person in history to lose weight without any behavior modification whatsoever, or most important, believing that you have a place in Hollywood when you’re constantly reminded that no one looks like you.

In “How to Look Spectacular: A Starlet’s Confessions,” Kaling gives her tongue-in-cheek secrets for surefire on-camera beauty, (“Your natural hair color may be appropriate for your skin tone, but this isn’t the land of appropriate–this is Hollywood, baby. Out here, a dark-skinned woman’s traditional hair color is honey blonde.”) “Player” tells the story of Kaling being seduced and dumped by a female friend in L.A. (“I had been replaced by a younger model. And now they had matching bangs.”) In “Unlikely Leading Lady,” she muses on America’s fixation with the weight of actresses, (“Most women we see onscreen are either so thin that they’re walking clavicles or so huge that their only scenes involve them breaking furniture.”) And in “Soup Snakes,” Kaling spills some secrets on her relationship with her ex-boyfriend and close friend, B.J. Novak (“I will freely admit: my relationship with B.J. Novak is weird as hell.”)

Mindy turns the anxieties, the glamour, and the celebrations of her second coming-of-age into a laugh-out-loud funny collection of essays that anyone who’s ever been at a turning point in their life or career can relate to. And those who’ve never been at a turning point can skip to the parts where she talks about meeting Bradley Cooper.


It probably comes as no surprise to anyone who has been following my blog or my twitter (@milkamilka) that I love Mindy Kaling. As a huge American comedy fan, I first was introduced to Kaling while watching The Office, the greatest TV comedy ever created, in my humble opinion. From The Office I moved to The Mindy Project and since then I've been actively following Mindy Kaling's career. Like my favorite comedienne Amy Poehler, Mindy is funny, honest and hard-working. And she writes extremely well, of which Why Not Me? is a great proof of.

I read Mindy's first book Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? a couple of years ago and fell in love with Mindy's style of writing. Reading her essays is like chatting with your best friends. Some of the essays made me smile, some made me question my own choices, and most of all, they made me feel quite empowered. The case what same with Why Not Me?. While reading the book it is easy to see that Mindy has matured quite a bit between the two essay collections. The essays in Why Not Me? feel much more personal, much more thoughtful and as a result of that, much more empowering. 

Why Not Me? is hilarious and entertaining, but it also really made me think and ask questions about my own decisions and actions. There are hilarious bit in there, like Mindy's tales of her friendship with B.J. Novak or her imaginations about life in which she is a Latin teacher in New York City. But more that anything, this book, for me, was a proof of what hard work and determination can give you. I have always thought of myself as a hard worker, someone who likes to finish what she starts, someone who aims high. And though I probably won't become a Hollywood comedian, this book made me realize more profoundly that with hard work and effort I can become respected on my own field of expertise. 

Why Not Me? also shows the non-glamorous side of Mindy's life. Dating is difficult (she really seems to struggle with the problems we all struggle with), she doesn't have time for anything else but work (it is not like she complains though - she very well expresses that she is doing exactly what she has been dreaming about and that she is very very very grateful of that) and she worries about her image and the way other people see her. All in all, this book further solidified by image of Mindy Kaling as someone who is down to earth, real and honest, someone who acknowledges her mistakes, is willing to help others and is not afraid to speak her mind when it is needed. 

I am not going to say who you should see as your role model, but I do think Mindy Kaling is someone that can offer something for everyone. I personally feel like I know her a bit better after reading this book. I am also very excited to see how her career develops with The Mindy Project now playing on Hulu (THE FIRST TWO EPISODES OF SEASON 4 HAVE BEEN FANTASTIC) and what kind of projects she has in the future. I respect Mindy Kaling a lot, and like her, I will start to ask the question WHY NOT ME? when someone questions my actions and dreams. 



Saturday, September 26, 2015

Stacking the Shelves (#35)


"Stacking The Shelves is all about sharing the books you are adding to your shelves, may it be physical or virtual. This means you can include books you buy in physical store or online, books you borrow from friends or the library, review books, gifts and of course ebooks!"

For more information, click here


Future Perfect by Jen Larsen

Every year on her birthday, Ashley Perkins gets a card from her grandmother—a card that always contains a promise: lose enough weight, and I will buy your happiness.

Ashley doesn’t think there’s anything wrong with the way she looks, but no amount of arguing can persuade her grandmother that “fat” isn’t a dirty word—that Ashley is happy with her life, and her body, as it is.
But Ashley wasn’t counting on having her dreams served up on a silver platter at her latest birthday party. She falters when Grandmother offers the one thing she’s always wanted: tuition to attend Harvard University—in exchange for undergoing weight loss surgery.

As Ashley grapples with the choice that little white card has given her, she feels pressured by her friends, her family, even administrators at school. But what’s a girl to do when the reflection in her mirror seems to bother everyone but her?

Through her indecisions and doubts, Ashley’s story is a liberating one—a tale of one girl, who knows that weight is just a number, and that no one is completely perfect.

As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time

From the Modern Library’s new set of beautifully repackaged hardcover classics by William Faulkner—also available are Snopes, The Sound and the Fury, Light in August, Absalom, Absalom!, and Selected Short Stories


One of William Faulkner’s finest novels, As I Lay Dying, originally published in 1930, remains a captivating and stylistically innovative work. The story revolves around a grim yet darkly humorous pilgrimage, as Addie Bundren’s family sets out to fulfill her last wish: to be buried in her native Jefferson, Mississippi, far from the miserable backwater surroundings of her married life. Told through multiple voices, As I Lay Dying vividly brings to life Faulkner’s imaginary South, one of literature’s great invented landscapes, and is replete with the poignant, impoverished, violent, and hypnotically fascinating characters that were his trademark. Along with a new Foreword by E. L. Doctorow, this edition reproduces the corrected text of As I Lay Dying as established in 1985 by Faulkner expert Noel Polk.

Why Not Me? by Mindy Kaling

From the author of the beloved New York Times bestselling book Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? and the creator and star of The Mindy Project comes a collection of essays that are as hilarious and insightful as they are deeply personal.

In Why Not Me?, Kaling shares her ongoing journey to find contentment and excitement in her adult life, whether it’s falling in love at work, seeking new friendships in lonely places, attempting to be the first person in history to lose weight without any behavior modification whatsoever, or most important, believing that you have a place in Hollywood when you’re constantly reminded that no one looks like you.

In “How to Look Spectacular: A Starlet’s Confessions,” Kaling gives her tongue-in-cheek secrets for surefire on-camera beauty, (“Your natural hair color may be appropriate for your skin tone, but this isn’t the land of appropriate–this is Hollywood, baby. Out here, a dark-skinned woman’s traditional hair color is honey blonde.”) “Player” tells the story of Kaling being seduced and dumped by a female friend in L.A. (“I had been replaced by a younger model. And now they had matching bangs.”) In “Unlikely Leading Lady,” she muses on America’s fixation with the weight of actresses, (“Most women we see onscreen are either so thin that they’re walking clavicles or so huge that their only scenes involve them breaking furniture.”) And in “Soup Snakes,” Kaling spills some secrets on her relationship with her ex-boyfriend and close friend, B.J. Novak (“I will freely admit: my relationship with B.J. Novak is weird as hell.”)

Mindy turns the anxieties, the glamour, and the celebrations of her second coming-of-age into a laugh-out-loud funny collection of essays that anyone who’s ever been at a turning point in their life or career can relate to. And those who’ve never been at a turning point can skip to the parts where she talks about meeting Bradley Cooper.
 


What did you add to your shelves this week?


Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Waiting on Wednesday (#42) - Summer of Sloane by Erin L. Schneider (May 3rd 2016 by Disney Hyperion)


Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Jill over at Breaking the Spine that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating. 
For more information click here


Summer of Sloane by Erin L. Schneider


Warm Hawaiian sun. Lazy beach days. Flirty texts with her boyfriend back in Seattle.

These are the things seventeen-year-old Sloane McIntyre pictured when she imagined the summer she’d be spending at her mom’s home in Hawaii with her twin brother, Penn. Instead, after learning an unthinkable secret about her boyfriend, Tyler, and best friend, Mick, all she has is a fractured hand and a completely shattered heart.

Once she arrives in Honolulu, though, Sloane hopes that Hawaii might just be the escape she needs. With beach bonfires, old friends, exotic food, and the wonders of a waterproof cast, there’s no reason Sloane shouldn’t enjoy her summer. And when she meets Finn McAllister, the handsome son of a hotel magnate who doesn’t always play by the rules, she knows he’s the perfect distraction from everything that’s so wrong back home.

But it turns out a measly ocean isn’t nearly enough to stop all the emails, texts, and voicemails from her ex-boyfriend and ex-best friend, desperate to explain away their betrayal. And as her casual connection with Finn grows deeper, Sloane’s carefree summer might not be as easy to find as she’d hoped. Weighing years of history with Mick and Tyler against their deception, and the delicate possibility of new love, Sloane must decide when to forgive, and when to live for herself.

"after learning an unthinkable secret about her boyfriend, Tyler, and best friend, Mick, all she has is a fractured hand and a completely shattered heart."


"beach bonfires, old friends, exotic food"


"Finn McAllister, the handsome son of a hotel 
magnate who doesn't always play by the rules"



"Sloane must decide when to forgive, and when to live for herself"


What are you waiting for this week?

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Top Ten Tuesday (#45) - Top Ten Books On My Fall TBR

For more information on Top Ten Tuesday click here


Fall is here, whether we want it or not. I am actually quite a fan of fall - the weather starts to get chillier, ice hockey season starts, TV shows start again, you get to wear knit wear and cozy up with a cup of coffee or tea and a good book. 

This week's Top Ten Tuesday topic is FALL TBR. With university taking quite a bit of time at the moment, I haven't been able to read in a way I did during the summer, but I am hoping that I'll get to these books at some point during this fall. 

Please let me know in the comments what you are planning to read this fall? Also, what's your fall drink of choice? Mine is probably just plain coffee now that I am exiled from the wonderful fall drinks offered by the likes of Starbucks and Costa. 



1. Why Not Me by Mindy Kaling - I love Mindy, so it is kind of hard for me to believe I haven't read this one already (yeah, I know it was published only last week, but still...). I loved Mindy's first book, and since then I have become more and more interested in her and her work, so I have a feeling I'll love this one even more. 

2. The Martian by Andy Weir - I've had this book on my shelf since summer and I believe it is a high time to read it. The film is also coming soon, and though I probably won't be running to the movie theatre to see it, I do want to watch it at some point (mostly because of Matt Damon). 

3. Vengeance Road by Erin Bowman - This one sounds so epic and wonderful and exactly like a book that could make me forget my studies for a while. 

4. Future Perfect by Jen Larsen - Despite the somewhat mixed reviews, I am ready to give this a chance. With Dumplin' as my favorite read for this year so far, I hope this is body positive as it is. 

5. Truest by Jackie Lea Sommers - This one was highly a cover pick, but it also sounds like a wonderful contemporary read. Also, the Goodreads ratings and the reviews I've read have praised this one.


6. Tonight the Streets Are Ours by Leila Sales - I absolutely LOVED This Song Will Save Your Life, so obviously I am very excited about this one. Also, that cover is absolutely beautiful!

7. Weird Girl and What's His Name by Meagan Brothers - I don't know much about this one, but for some reason I requested it for review, so yeah, that's why it's on this list. Sometimes it is good to go to books without knowing anything about them though, so we'll see what happens with this one.

8. Paperweight by Meg Haston - I have been meaning to read this one since summer, but I've heard that it might break my heart, so I will need a perfect time to read it. 

9. This Is Where the World Ends by Amy Zhang - I loved Amy Zhang's debut and purely because of that, this is a must item on my TBR.

10. Last First Kiss by Lia Riley - Honestly, this one does not sound like my normal kind of read, but since so many people I've chatted about this one with have loved it, I thought I should give it a try. 

Sunday, September 20, 2015

You Should Watch This (#2) - Full House


A while ago, I posted by first YOU SHOULD WATCH THIS POST featuring Hulu's original series Difficult People. Because writing that post was a lot of fun, I thought I would write a second one now that I am finished watching Full House. 


I started my master's degree at the beginning of this month and since then I have had less time to read. And when there has been time, I have been too exhausted from all the new information and customs of the school that I have rather just hit bed and binge-watched shows. I started watching Full House at the end of June and now I am finished with it. To summarize my watching experience, I would say that for me, Full House was a show that I immensely enjoyed, but often found growing tired of after extensive binges. Because of the breaks I had to take, watching the show took a bit longer than I expected, but the breaks did me some good and now that I am done, I will forever hold this show in a special place in my heart.


I am a huge fan of comedy and though Full House is not the type of comedy I typically enjoy, I loved it. Most of the jokes of the show repeat themselves and are geared towards family audiences, but nevertheless, they got me laughing. I also loved the continuity and repetition of the jokes because they really dragged you in to this family and their lives. There's the annoying/lovable neighbor Kimmy who grows up alongside the Tanner girls, there's Jesse and his hair, there's Danny and his desire for neatness, there's Joey and his cartoons...

I know that for a lot of my American viewers Full House was probably a part of their childhood. I am from Finland and I am not quite sure whether this shows was ever shown in Finnish TV. It is not part of my childhood in any way and my very first touch to it was not until I was 16 and moved to US and saw reruns of it on one of the cable channels we had. I liked it then because I was still learning to use English in my everyday speech and thought that it included good words and sayings. I also kind of fell in love with John Stamos. After I moved back to Finland, I kind of forgot Full House, until I heard about Fuller House.


Fuller House will come to Netflix next year and I must admit I am VERY EXCITED! Though Michelle, especially todler Michelle, is one of my favorite parts of the original show, I am not too disappointed of the fact that Fuller House won't be as focused on Michelle as the last few seasons of the original show. I am also extremely excited to see Kimmy again, because she is one of my favorite characters of the whole show.

Full House definitely isn't perfect. It has tendency to portray the Tanner girls as perfection against the mistakes of the other kids. It can be cliche and the humor can be quite lazy. But it is also one of those shows that is extremely easy to watch. The characters and the actors are wonderful and your heart probably has to be made of ice if you don't melt seeing John Stamos interact with the young Olsen twins. One thing I also want to note - IT IS EXTREMELY INTERESTING TO LOOK HOW THE STYLES OF THE CHARACTERS CHANGE. From 80s to 90s, from horrible to actually quite stylist (I mean some of DJs clothes in the end are stuff that's on top again).


Did you watch Full House growing up? Are you looking forward to Fuller House

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Book Review: Wise Blood by Flannery O'Connor

Release Year: 1952
The Paperback edition I read published by Faber and Faber in 2008
Age group: Adult
Pages: 160

Description (from Goodreads):

Wise Blood, Flannery O’Connor’s astonishing and haunting first novel, is a classic of twentieth-century literature. It is a story of Hazel Motes, a twenty-two-year-old caught in an unending struggle against his innate, desperate faith. He falls under the spell of a "blind" street preacher named Asa Hawks and his degenerate fifteen-year-old daughter, Lily Sabbath. In an ironic, malicious gesture of his own non-faith, and to prove himself a greater cynic than Hawkes, Hazel Motes founds The Church of God Without Christ, but is still thwarted in his efforts to lose God. He meets Enoch Emery, a young man with "wise blood," who leads him to a mummified holy child, and whose crazy maneuvers are a manifestation of Hazel's existential struggles. This tale of redemption, retribution, false prophets, blindness, blindings, and wisdoms gives us one of the most riveting characters in twentieth-century American fiction.

Flannery O'Connor's debut novel Wise Blood published in 1952 offered me a bit of a chance from YA literature, which is what I have been reading mainly for the past year or so. I'm one of those people who always keeps saying that I should read more classics, but that never really happens, and to be honest, I do not feel too bad about it. I don't think reading is something we should feel bad about - there are no right books to read, despite all these lists that circulate in the internet and magazines about the books you simply have to read before you turn 30, before you die, before you read anything else etc. Just read what feels good for you. Just read! That's the most important thing, at least for me.

I was a much bigger classics reader before I fell in love with YA. Once I noticed that my new university was offering an American literature reading course, I instantly got excited because I knew that it would not only give me study points, but it would also encourage me to read books out of my current comfort zone. After getting a list of authors and making an excursion to the library, Flannery O'Connor's debut was my first pick, mostly because it sounded so weird to me, and when it comes to classics, it almost seems like the weirder, the better.

I am not quite sure how to approach this review. I certainly feel like I cannot do it in the same way I do with my YA reviews. The thing is - with YA books I often look for characters I can relate with, stories that are realistic, stories that have a bit of romance or a really good friendship portrayal or, if I do read something else than contemporary, stories that really amaze me with their world building and their originality. I definitely did not relate with Wise Blood. For a lot of the time it feels more like a dream or a nightmare than something real. The characters are all quite difficult to approach and to like. But despite these factors, I think it was a pretty great novel. Weird, but certainly great.

One of the most tangible aspects of the novel is the highly disturbing religious themes it deals with. The main character of the novel, Hazel Motes, has been discharged from service in World World 2 after which he travels to the town of Taulkinham. He is from a religious background, but the horrors of the war have made him lose his religious beliefs and he is now questioning the concepts of salvation, original sin as well as the role of Jesus and what he, according to religion, did to save the sinners. Though Hazel states that he does not believe in anything and starts to preach antireligious thoughts, his attire, his thoughts and his actions tell another story. Essentially, much of the novel deals with Hazel's inner struggles of finding a way to understand his beliefs and religion. 

In addition to Hazel, the novel focuses on characters like Enoch, an eighteen year old young man with some serious mental issues. Enoch beliefs he is controlled by his blood and actually introduces the concept of "Wise Blood" to Hazel. Once the events of the novel start to unfold, the journeys of Hazel and Enoch entwine in more ways that one, occasionally in quite disturbing manner.

Wise Blood is quite a short novel, but it definitely is packed with a lot to discuss and interpret. I wanted to keep this review quite short since I need to put my thoughts together more before I actually start to work on my essay. In general, I found Wise Blood to be an entertaining, very weird, interestingly written piece of literature that I am very happy I ended picking up from the vast collection at the library. 

There's an 1979 film adaptation of the novel directed by John Huston that I will definitely check out at some point too!


Saturday, September 12, 2015

Stacking the Shelves (#34)


"Stacking The Shelves is all about sharing the books you are adding to your shelves, may it be physical or virtual. This means you can include books you buy in physical store or online, books you borrow from friends or the library, review books, gifts and of course ebooks!"

For more information, click here


Tonight the Streets are Ours by Leila Sales

From the author of This Song Will Save Your Life comes a funny and relatable book about the hazards of falling for a person you haven't met yet.

Seventeen-year-old Arden Huntley is recklessly loyal. Taking care of her loved ones is what gives Arden purpose in her life and makes her feel like she matters. But she's tired of being loyal to people who don't appreciate her—including her needy best friend and her absent mom.

Arden finds comfort in a blog she stumbles upon called "Tonight the Streets Are Ours," the musings of a young New York City writer named Peter. When Peter is dumped by the girlfriend he blogs about, Arden decides to take a road trip to see him.

During one crazy night out in NYC filled with parties, dancing, and music—the type of night when anything can happen, and nearly everything does—Arden discovers that Peter isn't exactly who she thought he was. And maybe she isn't exactly who she thought she was, either.
 

Last First Kiss (Brightwater #1) by Lia Riley

A kiss is only the beginning...

Pinterest Perfect. Or so Annie Carson’s life appears on her popular blog. Reality is... messier. Especially when it lands her back in one-cow town, Brightwater, California, and back in the path of the gorgeous six-foot-four reason she left. Sawyer Kane may fill out those wranglers, but she won’t be distracted from her task. Annie just needs the summer to spruce up and sell her family’s farm so she and her young son can start a new life in the big city. Simple, easy, perfect.

Sawyer has always regretted letting the first girl he loved slip away. He won’t make the same mistake twice, but can he convince beautiful, wary Annie to trust her heart again when she’s been given every reason not to? And as a single kiss turns to so much more, can Annie give up her idea of perfect for a forever that’s blissfully real.

Heart-Shaped Hack by Tracey Garvis Graves

When Kate Watts abandoned her law career to open a food pantry in Northeast Minneapolis, she never dreamed it would be this difficult. Facing the heartbreaking prospect of turning hungry people away, she is grateful for the anonymous donations that begin appearing at the end of each month. Determined to identify and thank her secret benefactor, she launches a plan and catches Ian —a charismatic hacker with a Robin Hood complex—in the act. 

Ian intrigues Kate in a way no man ever has. But after learning he’s snooped around on her personal computer, she demands retribution. Impressed with her tolerance and captivated by her spirit, he complies and begins to slowly charm his way past her defenses. Time spent with Ian is never boring, and Kate soon finds herself falling for the mysterious hacker. 

But Ian has enemies and they’re growing restless. In the hacking world, exploiting a target’s weakness is paramount, and no price is too high to stop an attack. And when Kate learns exactly how much Ian has paid, she’ll discover just how strong her love is for the man who has hacked his way into her heart. 


Have you read any of these books?
What did you add to your shelves this week?
HAVE A GREAT SATURDAY!